THE BRICK COTTAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

THE HOME OF THE WORKINGMAN IS THE BALANCING WHEEL OF DEMOCRACY

Faced with a severe housing shortage in many industrial centers during the First World War, the federal government created the U.S. Housing Corporation and the Emergency Fleet Corporation and entered the housing business. In shipyards and munitions centers across the country, the federal government built housing to meet the growing needs of the nations industrial army. Architects and urban planners saw their work as providing more than shelter for the national toilers. With few exceptions, historians of World War I government housing have confined their focus to the genealogy and transference of English design influence to the United States. The Bridgeport Housing Company was incorporated to build housing developments to meet this need. Several developments were built in Bridgeport, one in Fairfield and one in Lordship. The Lordship site was selected due the proximity of the trolley line which went past the rotary, the school which was located on the second floor of the Lordship Casino and a play area. The company built under the direction of one of the well known architects of the country a group of houses in Fairfield and a second group of houses in Lordship. These suburbs are located within easy reaching distance of all of the manufacturing plants in the city. These tracts are laid out with care with proper streets, playgrounds, etc. Each house is arranged so that it will have a minimum of five rooms and bath and maximum of seven rooms and bath to each single house. The semi-detached houses have been built with five rooms and bath to each family and it is planned to build other semi-detached houses with six and seven rooms and bath each.

Bungalows1917

Bungalows 1917

Brickcottages1917

Brick cottages 1917

BrickCottages1917a

Brick cottages 1917

BrickCottages1917b

Brick cottages 1917

BrickCottages1917c

Brick cottages 1917

BrickCottages1917

Brick cottages 1917

BrickCottage1917

Brick cottage 1917

1917Prospect50

Brick cottage 1917

1917Prospect60

Brick cottage 1917

1917Prospect20

Brick cottage 1917

1917Grove120

Brick cottage 1917

1917Grove100

Brick cottage 1917

TheLordship1918

The Lordship 1918

LordshipHomes1918

Lordship Homes 1918

The lotting of the Lordship group is of particular interest because the land had previously been subdivided badly and lots had been sold. The subdivision by Mr. Sturgis provides for as many families, makes lotting more normal, introduces some interest of grouping and has left over, a natural circular depression, screened by large trees, which is to be reserved for a community group of future garages. The Fairfield homes should attain at once more of the neighborhood quality than the Lordship community, because in occupying both sides of its street it thereby becomes at once a self contained unit of population. The Lordship collection of houses appears, on paper, far more unified and complete, yet in that all its houses, except two, face out toward property over which the housing company has no control, the effect in execution will be better held together in the group where both sides of the street belong in the picture. Yet immediate contrast between what has been and what may be our workman's home building standards, has its advantages.

1917Hemlock15

Brick cottage 1917

1917Plan

Brick cottage plan 1917

1917Floor

Brick cottage floor plan

1917Floorlayout

Brick cottage floor plan

1917Floorplan

Brick cottage floor plan

Brickcottages1919

Brick cottages 1919

Brickcottage1921

Brick cottage 1921

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